Euodice cantans | African silverbill

Introduced

The first record of African silverbills in Hawaiʻi was in the 1970s. Like many of the small seed-eating birds, it can be most easily observed in dry areas and near water sources. They are only 4 ½ inches long with pale brown and light gray. Their bill is a blue-gray. Listen for them in small flocks “tinkling” like little bells.

Hotspots for African silverbill

Keāhole Point

Open Ocean

LookoutParking

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingPicnic areaRanger StationTrash

Honua‘ula Forest Reserve (Makāula -‘O‘oma section)

Wet forest

HikingParking

Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Halapepe and ʻŌhiʻa Trails

Dry forestPasture and grasslands

HikingBathroomParkingTrash

Waiki‘i (off Old Saddle Road)

Pasture and grasslands

Driving

Palila Forest Discovery Trail

Dry forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Pu‘u Huluhulu Trail

Dry forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Wailoa River State Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingLookoutParkingPicnic areaTrash

Loko Waka Pond

Coastal Wetland

LookoutBathroomParkingPicnic areaTrash
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