Buteo solitarius | Hawaiian hawk | ʻio

Endemic

Other Names: io

Not many birds are as graceful and stately as the native ʻio, or Hawaiian hawk, seen soaring over fields, forest edges, and even towns. ʻIo are between 16-18 inches long, males are smaller than females. There are two major color phases that can be observed: dark phase birds are dark brown throughout; and light phase birds are dark brown above, and light below with some streaking. ʻIo are associated with Hawaiian royalty, partly because of their ability to soar higher than any other native bird.

Hotspots for Hawaiian hawk

Keāhole Point

Open Ocean

LookoutParking

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park

Coastal Wetland

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Honua‘ula Forest Reserve (Makāula -‘O‘oma section)

Wet forest

HikingParking

Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Halapepe and ʻŌhiʻa Trails

Dry forestPasture and grasslands

HikingBathroomParkingTrash

Waiki‘i (off Old Saddle Road)

Pasture and grasslands

Driving

Palila Forest Discovery Trail

Dry forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Pu‘u Huluhulu Trail

Dry forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Kaulana Manu Nature Trail (OPENING 2018)

Wet forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Kaūmana Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Wailoa River State Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingLookoutParkingPicnic areaTrash

Loko Waka Pond

Coastal Wetland

LookoutBathroomParkingPicnic areaTrash
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