Zosterops japonicus | Japanese white-eye

Introduced

Other Names: mejiro, メジロ, 目白

At about 4 inches, the mejiro, or Japanese white-eye, is very common in Hawaiʻi. A fast-moving green bird, their white eye rings makes them stand out. They are omnivorous and feed mostly on insects and nectar. Mejiro were first introduced to Hawai’I in 1929 to help control insect pests but they are now the most abundant land bird in Hawaiʻi and may even compete with native birds for food.

Hotspots for Japanese white-eye

Keāhole Point

Open Ocean

LookoutParking

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park

Coastal Wetland

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Honua‘ula Forest Reserve (Makāula -‘O‘oma section)

Wet forest

HikingParking

Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Halapepe and ʻŌhiʻa Trails

Dry forestPasture and grasslands

HikingBathroomParkingTrash

Waiki‘i (off Old Saddle Road)

Pasture and grasslands

Driving

Palila Forest Discovery Trail

Dry forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Pu‘u Huluhulu Trail

Dry forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Kaulana Manu Nature Trail (OPENING 2018)

Wet forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Kaūmana Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Wailoa River State Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingLookoutParkingPicnic areaTrash

Loko Waka Pond

Coastal Wetland

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