Myadestes obscurus | omao | ʻōmaʻo

Endemic

Other Names: Hawaiian thrush

The ʻōmaʻo is one of only two remaining species of native thrush (the other being the endangered puaiohi of Kauaʻi) that were once common throughout Hawaiʻi. They eat fruit and play a role in spreading native plants throughout the forest. Mysteriously, they have not been seen in the Kona and Kohala areas of Hawaiʻi Island for over a century, possibly due to an early virus or disease. Normally preferring native forest, there seems to be a distinct population in the subalpine zone of Mauna Loa.

Hotspots for omao

Pu‘u Huluhulu Trail

Dry forest

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Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Trail

Wet forest

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Kaulana Manu Nature Trail (OPENING 2018)

Wet forest

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Kaūmana Trail

Wet forest

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