Haemorhous mexicanus | house finch

Introduced

Native to western North America, the house finch was introduced to Hawaiʻi in the mid-1800s and are now common on all main islands. They are most common on the leeward or dry sides of the islands. A medium sized finch (about 5 ½ inches), house finches are mostly gray-brown with a boldly streaked breast and males have a red/orange head and breast. House Finches sing a long, jumbled warbling song composed of short notes that often ends with an upward or downward slur.

Hotspots for house finch

Keāhole Point

Open Ocean

LookoutParking

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingPicnic areaRanger StationTrash

Honua‘ula Forest Reserve (Makāula -‘O‘oma section)

Wet forest

HikingParking

Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Halapepe and ʻŌhiʻa Trails

Dry forestPasture and grasslands

HikingBathroomParkingTrash

Waiki‘i (off Old Saddle Road)

Pasture and grasslands

Driving

Palila Forest Discovery Trail

Dry forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Pu‘u Huluhulu Trail

Dry forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Kaulana Manu Nature Trail (OPENING 2018)

Wet forest

HikingBathroomInterpretive SignageParkingTrash

Kaūmana Trail

Wet forest

HikingInterpretive SignageParking

Wailoa River State Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingLookoutParkingPicnic areaTrash

Loko Waka Pond

Coastal Wetland

LookoutBathroomParkingPicnic areaTrash
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