Arenaria interpres | ruddy turnstone | ʻakekeke

Regular Migrant

Other Names: akekeke

The ʻakekeke, or ruddy turnstone, is a common winter visitor to Hawaiʻi from August to May. During the summer, they live in the arctic. At 9 inches, they are a brown with white bellies with black markings on their heads and chests. They have a small black bill and orange legs. When preparing to fly to the arctic, they are more mottled black and rust-red. Theu use their bill to turn over stones along the shore, looking for insects and shellfish. Listen for their call, saying their name, “a-ke-ke-ke.”

Hotspots for ruddy turnstone

Keāhole Point

Open Ocean

LookoutParking

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park

Coastal Wetland

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Wailoa River State Park

Coastal Wetland

HikingLookoutParkingPicnic areaTrash

Loko Waka Pond

Coastal Wetland

LookoutBathroomParkingPicnic areaTrash
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