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saffron finch

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

Introduced in 1965, saffron finches have expanded to most of Hawaiʻi Island especially in short grassy areas along the coasts and in open lawns. Adults are about 5 ½ inches, yellow in color with some stripes in the chest, black bill, and pink legs. Young birds have some yellow but are mostly gray-brown. Listen for ...
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yellow-billed cardinal

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

Native to South America, the yellow-billed cardinal is easily seen with their bright red head and namesake yellow beak. They also have black upperparts, a partial white collar that nearly meets at back of neck, white underparts, black chin and throat, and brown-pink legs and feet. Females are more gray with a brown head. They ...
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common myna

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The common mynah was introduced to Hawaiʻi from india in 1865 to control army worms. While not the most abundant bird in Hawaiʻi, the common mynah is probably the most well-known bird among locals. They are widespread and common. Adults measure 9 inches and are brown with a black head. They have a white wing ...
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northern mockingbird

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The northern mockingbird was first introduced to Hawaiʻi in 1928 by the Hui Manu society to help control insect pests and because of their pleasant song. At about 10 inches, they are fairly large song bird with a long tail. With a gray-brown body with paler chest and belly, they have distinct white wing patches ...
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red-billed leiothrix

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The red-billed leiothrix, or Chinese hill robin, is a beautiful and popular cage bird. This spunky bird is very noisy and can often be heard “scolding” human trespassers before they even knew one was nearby. They eat fruit and play a role in dispersing seeds throughout the forest. They only reach about 5 inches in ...
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Chinese hwamei

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The hwamei, or melodious laughing-thrush, is originally from central China. First released on Oʻahu as escapees during a fire. They were then purposefully introduced to the other islands. A secretive brown forest bird with a white eye-line, it is rarely seen but conspicuous by its long melodic song.  

warbling white-eye

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

At about 4 inches, the mejiro, or Japanese white-eye, is very common in Hawaiʻi. A fast-moving green bird, their white eye rings makes them stand out. They are omnivorous and feed mostly on insects and nectar. Mejiro were first introduced to Hawai’I in 1929 to help control insect pests but they are now the most ...
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Japanese bush-warbler

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The uguisu or Japanese bush warbler is less than 6-inches long with drab brown feathers and pale eyebrows. A secretive bird, they hide in dense foliage and so, more often than not, the average bird watcher will hear this bird rather than see it. It has a loud sustained whistle followed by several quick notes ...
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Eurasian skylark

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The melodious Eurasian skylark was first introduced to Hawaiʻi in 1870 and were released on Hawaiʻi island in 1902. Mostly brown on top and paler below, the over seven-inch skylark looks relatively plain. It spends most of its time on the ground but during courtship the male will hover at about 200 feet up in ...
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red-masked parakeet

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The red-masked parakeet is a released cage bird first observed on the Big Island in 1988. These nomadic loud social birds forage along the Kona coast but roost and breed in pit craters at high elevations on Hualālai mountain. They now number in the hundreds and can be a pest to coffee farmers.

barn owl

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The barn owl is the only introduced species of owl in Hawaiʻi. They are sometimes mistakenly identified as the native pueo by locals and are common on all islands. Unlike the pueo, barn owls only hunt at night. Adults are 14-20 inches long with a white, heart shaped face, dark eyes and a pale bill. ...
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mourning dove

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The mourning dove is less common than the other doves you see in Hawaiʻi. It was brought to Hawaiʻi from North America around the mid-1960s where it was released at Puʻu Waʻawaʻa. It was named after the mournful sound of its call. They are only about one foot long and light grey-brown in color with ...
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zebra dove

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

Another cosmopolitan species, the Zebra Dove was introduced in 1922 and by the 1930’s were common on all the main islands but the Big Island which they eventually colonized as well. They are quite tame and can be seen courting and feeding around any outdoor restaurant or park.

spotted dove

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

The spotted dove was introduced from Asia in the 1800s and has locally been used as a game bird for generations. They are common in urban and rural areas. Adults are 12 inches long, gray-brown plumage. There is a black band with white spots around the sides and back of the neck. Breast is rosy. ...
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rock pigeon

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 in

A common city pigeon, rock pigeons originate from Europe and northern Africa. An adept cosmopolitan coloniser, this species may have been introduced to Hawaiʻi as early as 1788. Usually seen in urban areas, but also along rocky cliffs. They have a shiny green neck and grey body with black wing stripes. In urban areas, they ...
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